Wps office releases urgent guidelines on protecting office software files from the wannacry ransomware virus


According to reports, more than 200,000 victims in 150 countries have been negatively impacted by the WannaCry ransomware virus, with many individuals and organizations seeking expert opinions to determine if they are a potential victim of these threats. Leaked earlier this year, the WannaCry ransomware virus uses a flaw in Microsoft’s operating system that was discovered by the U.S. National Security Agency and leaked by individuals, spreading rapidly across local and wide area networks around the world. No country was spared in this attack and those suffering under the consequences of the virus continue to mount. There appeared to be a pause in the activity of the virus as a result of a kill switch that was discovered by an IT security expert in the United Kingdom. Activating the kill switch halted the progress of the virus but many individuals and organizations are still feeling the impact of this malware.

Ransomware is malicious malware that comes in the form of a software download or other transmission vehicle that locks files on a computer and demands payments to release them. Ransomware threats have been rising steadily for some time. However, the most recent attacks by WannaCry were referred to as “unprecedented” by European authorities because of the scope and scale of many successful attacks. WannaCry can affect computers running the Windows operating system, but many systems have been untouched by the virus through simple IT housekeeping.

The software development experts at WPS Office note that there are steps that can be taken to prevent ransomware attacks. Furthermore, for WPS Office customers, there are remedies available to retrieve encrypted files if an attack has already occurred. The guidance for WPS users on the Microsoft operating system is to ensure that the Windows Update is run regularly to download the latest operating system patches and fixes. Next, the user’s computing device should have anti-virus installed if not already in place and checked to ensure that software is also up to date. Experts also advise that the virus software should be set to scan automatically to identify and protect against possible threats, making it more difficult for these viruses to succeed. Additionally, all data on PCs and servers should be backed up to a remote location or device so that it cannot be held for ransom. Finally, two significant, yet simple safeguards known to prevent such attacks include inspecting links sent through email before clicking on them and avoiding the download of any unknown software as a daily best practice.

WPS Office users that have been impacted by ransomware have options available to them that can be used to retrieve data. First, those storing their office files in WPS Cloud may simply login to their account and download the imprisoned files in a matter of minutes to either the affected computer or any other computing device available. Alternately, those with files stored only on their PC have the ability to use the WPS Data Recovery Tool. This tool is for those files originally stored on a local device (ie: desktop or laptop). Originally developed by WPS Office to recover accidentally deleted data, the WPS Data Recovery Tool can now be used to recover any office file on the user’s device. This includes Writer, Presentation, or Spreadsheet files that have simply disappeared as a result of a ransomware attack.

Unfortunately, the spread of ransomware is in its early stages and destined to continue to have a severe impact on both individuals and businesses. The benefit of WPS Office is that there are methods of recovering data that has fallen subject to WannaCry or any other variant. In the event that your data is impounded by ransomware, experts advise remaining calm and reviewing your computing environment for available options made possible by following the advice above. Do not pay the ransom demanded by the ransomware as there is no guarantee that your data will be unlocked and returned – and there is no refund of your ransom if the perpetrators do not release the files. Follow the guidance above if you do experience a ransomware attack and contact law enforcement to provide as many details as possible in order to help identify the perpetrators.

http://blog.wps.com/wps-office-releases-urgent-guidelines-on-protecting-office-software-files-from-the-wannacry-ransomware-virus/

On – 16 May, 2017 By Andy Pan

Unpatched WordPress Flaw Could Allow Hackers To Reset Admin Password

Unpatched WordPress Flaw Could Allow Hackers To Reset Admin Password

Thursday, May 04, 2017
hacking-wordpress-blog-admin-password-reset

WordPress, the most popular CMS in the world, is vulnerable to a logical vulnerability that could allow a remote attacker to reset targeted users’ password under certain circumstances.

The vulnerability (CVE-2017-8295) becomes even more dangerous after knowing that it affects all versions of WordPress — including the latest 4.7.4 version.

The WordPress flaw was discovered by Polish security researcher Dawid Golunski of Legal Hackers last year in July and reported it to the WordPress security team, who decided to ignore this issue, leaving millions of websites vulnerable.

“This issue has been reported to WordPress security team multiple times with the first report sent back in July 2016. It was reported both directly via security contact email, as well as via HackerOne website,” Golunski wrote in an advisory published today. “As there has been no progress, in this case, this advisory is finally released to the public without an official patch.”

Golunski is the same researcher who discovered a critical vulnerability in the popular open source PHPMailer libraries that allowed malicious actors to remotely execute arbitrary code in the context of the web server and compromise the target web application.

The vulnerability lies in the way WordPress processes the password reset request, for the user it has been initiated.

In general, when a user requests to reset his/her password through forgot password option, WordPress immediately generates a unique secret code and sends it to user’s email ID already stored in the database.

What’s the Vulnerability?

While sending this email, WordPress uses a variable called SERVER_NAME to obtain the hostname of a server to set values of the From/Return-Path fields.

wordpress-admin-password-reset-hacking

Here, “From” refers to the email address of the sender and “Return-Path” refers to the email address where ‘bounce-back’ emails should be delivered in the case of failure in the delivery for some reason.

According to Golunski, an attacker can send a spoofed HTTP request with a predefined custom hostname value (for example attacker-mxserver.com), while initiating password reset process for a targeted admin user.

Since the hostname in the malicious HTTP request is an attacker-controlled domain, the From and Return-Path fields in the password reset email will be modified to include an email ID associated with the attacker’s domain, i.e. wordpress@attacker-mxserver.com, instead of wordpress@victim-domain.com.

“Because of the modified HOST header, the SERVER_NAME will be set to the hostname of attacker’s choice. As a result, WordPress will pass the following headers and email body to the /usr/bin/sendmail wrapper,” Golunski says.

Don’t get confused here: You should note that the password reset email will be delivered to victim’s email address only, but since the From and Return-Path fields now point to attacker’s email ID, the attacker can also receive reset code under following scenarios:

  1. If, in case, the victim replies to that email, it will be delivered to attacker email ID (mentioned in ‘From’ field), containing a password reset link in the message history.
  2. If, for some reason, victim’s email server is down, the password reset email will automatically bounce-back to the email address mentioned in “Return-Path” field, which points to the attacker’s inbox.
  3. In another possible scenario, to forcefully retrieve bounce-back email, the attacker can perform a DDoS attack against the victim’s email server or send a large number of emails, so that the victim’s email account can no longer receive any email.

“The CVE-2017-8295 attack could potentially be carried out both with user interaction (the user hitting the ‘reply’ button scenario), or without user interaction (spam victim’s mailbox to exceed their storage quota),” Golunski told The Hacker News in an email.

For obvious reason, this is not a sure shot method, but in the case of targeted attacks, sophisticated hackers can manage to exploit this flaw successfully.

Another notable fact on which successful exploitation of this flaw depends is that, even if WordPress website is flawed, not all web servers allow an attacker to modify hostname via SERVER_NAME header, including WordPress hosted on any shared servers.

“SERVER_NAME server header can be manipulated on default configurations of Apache Web server (most common WordPress deployment) via HOST header of an HTTP request,” Golunski says.

Since the vulnerability has now been publically disclosed with no patch available from the popular CMS company, WordPress admins are advised to update their server configuration to enable UseCanonicalName to enforce static/predefined SERVER_NAME value.

Latest Stories

http://thehackernews.com/2017/05/hacking-wordpress-blog-admin.html

On – 04 May, 2017 By Mohit Kumar

Microsoft Issues Emergency Patch For Critical RCE in Windows Malware Scanner

Microsoft Issues Emergency Patch For Critical RCE in Windows Malware Scanner

Monday, May 08, 2017
windows-defender-remote-code-execution

Microsoft’s own antivirus software made Windows 7, 8.1, RT and 10 computers, as well as Windows Server 2016 more vulnerable.

Microsoft has just released an out-of-band security update to patch the crazy bad bug discovered by a pair of Google Project Zero researchers over the weekend.

Security researchers Tavis Ormandy announced on Twitter during the weekend that he and another Project Zero researcher Natalie Silvanovich discovered “the worst Windows remote code [execution vulnerability] in recent memory.”

Natalie Silvanovich also published a proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code that fits in a single tweet.

The reported RCE vulnerability, according to the duo, could work against default installations with “wormable” ability – capability to replicate itself on an infected computer and then spread to other PCs automatically.

According to an advisory released by Microsoft, the remotely exploitable security flaw (CVE-2017-0290) exists in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine (MMPE) – the company’s own antivirus engine that could be used to fully compromise Windows PCs without any user interaction.

List of Affected Anti-Malware Software

Eventually, every anti-malware software that ship with the Microsoft’s Malware Protection Engine are vulnerable to this flaw. The affected software includes:

  • Windows Defender
  • Windows Intune Endpoint Protection
  • Microsoft Security Essentials
  • Microsoft System Center Endpoint Protection
  • Microsoft Forefront Security for SharePoint
  • Microsoft Endpoint Protection
  • Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection

Microsoft’s Defender security software comes enabled by default on Windows 7, 8.1, RT 8.1, and Windows 10, as well as Windows Server 2016. All are at risk of full remote system compromise.

Remote Code Execution Flaw in Microsoft’s Malware Protection Engine

The flaw resides in the way the Microsoft Malware Protection Engine scan files. It is possible for an attacker to craft a malicious file that could lead to memory corruption on targeted systems.

Researchers have labeled the flaw as a “type confusion” vulnerability that exists in NScript, a “component of mpengine that evaluates any filesystem or network activity that looks like JavaScript,” which fails to validate JavaScript inputs.

“To be clear, this is an unsandboxed and highly privileged JavaScript interpreter that is used to evaluate untrusted code, by default on all modern Windows systems. This is as surprising as it sounds,” Google security researchers explained in a bug report posted on the Chromium forum.

Since antivirus programs have real-time scanning functionality enabled by default that automatically scans files when they are created, opened, copied or downloaded, the exploit gets triggered as soon as the malicious file is downloaded, infecting the target computer.

The vulnerability could be exploited by hackers in several ways, like sending emails, luring victims to sites that deliver malicious files, and instant messaging.

“On workstations, attackers can access mpengine by sending emails to users (reading the email or opening attachments is not necessary), visiting links in a web browser, instant messaging and so on,” researchers explained. 

“This level of accessibility is possible because MsMpEng uses a filesystem minifilter to intercept and inspect all system filesystem activity, so writing controlled contents to anywhere on disk (e.g. caches, temporary internet files, downloads (even unconfirmed downloads), attachments, etc.) is enough to access functionality in mpengine.”

The injected malicious payload runs with elevated LocalSystem level privileges that would allow hackers to gain full control of the target system, and perform malicious tasks like installing spyware, stealing sensitive files, and login credentials, and much more.

Microsoft responded to the issue very quickly and comes up with a patch within just 3 days, which is very impressive. The patch is now available via Windows Update for Windows 7, 8.1, RT and 10.

The vulnerable version of Microsoft Malware Protection Engine (MMPE) is 1.1.13701.0, and the patched version is 1.1.13704.0.

By default, Windows PCs automatically install the latest definitions and updates for the engine. So, your system will install the emergency update automatically within 1-2 days, but you can also get it installed immediately by pressing ‘Check Update’ button in your settings.

Latest Stories

http://thehackernews.com/2017/05/windows-defender-rce-flaw.html

On – 09 May, 2017 By Mohit Kumar

Ransomware attack hero condemns ‘super-invasive’ tabloids | Technology | The Guardian

He inadvertently halted the global spread of the international ransomware attack and will donate thousands of pounds of his reward money to charity, but Marcus Hutchins, the security expert labelled the “accidental hero”, has said his “five minutes of fame” have been “horrible”.

Hutchins, 22, was propelled into the media spotlight when he activated a “kill switch” in the malicious software that wreaked havoc on organisations including the UK’s National Health Service earlier this month. He originally told the Guardian how he spotted the URL not knowing what it would do at the time, and spoke under his alias of MalwareTech because he did not want to be identified.

But within two days Hutchins, who operates out of an English coastal town, tweeted that he had woken up to discover that his picture was on the front page of a newspaper and since then has become the centre of a media storm. At first the blogger saw the funny side of having to climb over his back wall to avoid reporters camped outside his house, but now, he says, the situation has escalated to the point that he feels the British tabloids have put his life in danger.

Writing of his experiences on Twitter, he also said the press had doxxed a friend of his, which involves searching for and publishing private or identifying information about a particular individual on the internet, typically with malicious intent.

Journalist doxed a friend then rang them offering money for my gf’s name and phone number, one turned up at another friend’s house.

Tabloids here don’t care about the story, they care about every detail of the person behind it and will go to extreme lengths to find out.

In a tweet that has since been deleted Hutchins wrote: “One of the largest UK newspapers published a picture of my house, full address, and directions to get there … now I have to move.” He later implored his supporters not to doxx journalists in revenge and reiterated that he had not sought fame.

The point I was trying to make is that I didn’t try to become famous, I tried to remain anonymous and was dragged into the spotlight.

@malwareunicorn @PolarToffee Girl with me in the photo that got posted on all the news sites is married to one of my best friends, who found the whole thing hilarious.

Hutchins got his first job straight after school without any serious qualifications thanks to his tech blog and skill at writing software, which he said has always been a hobby. He works remotely for Kryptos Logic, an LA-based threat intelligence company, which was impressed by his work and got in touch to offer him a job a little over a year ago.

Last week, he revealed that he had been awarded a bounty by HackerOne, a group that rewards ethical hackers for finding software flaws, and that he would divide the money between charities and educational resources for IT security students.

Offering the reward, HackerOne said: “Thank you for your active research into this malware and for making the internet safer!”

On Sunday, Hutchins said he had so far decided on four charities: Doctors Without Borders, Great Ormond Street, Charity: Water, and Hackers For Charity.

So far I’ve decided on 4 charities:
DoctorsWithoutBorders
Great Ormond Street
Charity: Water
Hackers For Charity

Did my best to vet all the previously suggested charities and the 4 above are the ones I felt best, but let me know if i missed something.

Ransomware is a type of malware that encrypts a user’s data, then demands payment in exchange for unlocking the data. This attack used a piece of malicious software called WannaCry, which exploits a vulnerability in Windows.

Microsoft released a patch (a software update that fixes the problem) for the flaw in March, but computers that have not installed the security update remain vulnerable.

Hutchins previously warned that the attack could return in a new form and advised people to patch their systems. “This is not over,” he said. “The attackers will realise how we stopped it, they’ll change the code and then they’ll start again.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/22/ransomware-attack-hero-marcus-hutchins-super-invasive-tabloids

On – 22 May, 2017 By Nadia Khomami

‘Accidental hero’ halts ransomware attack and warns: this is not over | Technology | The Guardian

The “accidental hero” who halted the global spread of an unprecedented ransomware attack by registering a garbled domain name hidden in the malware has warned the attack could be rebooted.

The ransomware used in Friday’s attack wreaked havoc on organisations including FedEx and Telefónica, as well as the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), where operations were cancelled, X-rays, test results and patient records became unavailable and phones did not work.

But the spread of the attack was brought to a sudden halt when one UK cybersecurity researcher tweeting as @malwaretechblog, with the help of Darien Huss from security firm Proofpoint, found and inadvertently activated a “kill switch” in the malicious software.

The researcher, who identified himself only as MalwareTech, is a 22-year-old from south-west England who works for Kryptos logic, an LA-based threat intelligence company.

“I was out having lunch with a friend and got back about 3pm and saw an influx of news articles about the NHS and various UK organisations being hit,” he told the Guardian. “I had a bit of a look into that and then I found a sample of the malware behind it, and saw that it was connecting out to a specific domain, which was not registered. So I picked it up not knowing what it did at the time.”

The kill switch was hardcoded into the malware in case the creator wanted to stop it spreading. This involved a very long nonsensical domain name that the malware makes a request to – just as if it was looking up any website – and if the request comes back and shows that the domain is live, the kill switch takes effect and the malware stops spreading. The domain cost $10.69 and was immediately registering thousands of connections every second.

MalwareTech explained that he bought the domain because his company tracks botnets, and by registering these domains they can get an insight into how the botnet is spreading. “The intent was to just monitor the spread and see if we could do anything about it later on. But we actually stopped the spread just by registering the domain,” he said. But the following hours were an “emotional rollercoaster”.

“Initially someone had reported the wrong way round that we had caused the infection by registering the domain, so I had a mini freakout until I realised it was actually the other way around and we had stopped it,” he said.

MalwareTech said he preferred to stay anonymous “because it just doesn’t make sense to give out my personal information, obviously we’re working against bad guys and they’re not going to be happy about this.”

He also said he planned to hold onto the URL, and he and colleagues were collecting the IPs and sending them off to law enforcement agencies so they can notify the infected victims, not all of whom are aware that they have been affected.

He warned people to patch their systems, adding: “This is not over. The attackers will realise how we stopped it, they’ll change the code and then they’ll start again. Enable windows update, update and then reboot.”

He said he got his first job out of school without any real qualifications, having skipped university to start up a tech blog and write software.

“It’s always been a hobby to me, I’m self-taught. I ended up getting a job out of my first botnet tracker, which the company I now work for saw and contacted me about, asking if I wanted a job. I’ve been working there a year and two months now.”

But the dark knight of the dark web still lives at home with his parents, which he joked was “so stereotypical”. His mum, he said, was aware of what had happened and was excited, but his dad hadn’t been home yet. “I’m sure my mother will inform him,” he said.

“It’s not going to be a lifestyle change, it’s just a five-minutes of fame sort of thing. It is quite crazy, I’ve not been able to check into my Twitter feed all day because it’s just been going too fast to read. Every time I refresh it it’s another 99 notifications.”

Proofpoint’s Ryan Kalember said the British researcher gets “the accidental hero award of the day”. “They didn’t realise how much it probably slowed down the spread of this ransomware”.

The time that @malwaretechblog registered the domain was too late to help Europe and Asia, where many organisations were affected. But it gave people in the US more time to develop immunity to the attack by patching their systems before they were infected, said Kalember.

The kill switch won’t help anyone whose computer is already infected with the ransomware, and it’s possible that there are other variants of the malware with different kill switches that will continue to spread.

The malware was made available online on 14 April through a dump by a group called Shadow Brokers, which claimed last year to have stolen a cache of “cyber weapons” from the National Security Agency (NSA).

Ransomware is a type of malware that encrypts a user’s data, then demands payment in exchange for unlocking the data. This attack used a piece of malicious software called “WanaCrypt0r 2.0” or WannaCry, that exploits a vulnerability in Windows. Microsoft released a patch (a software update that fixes the problem) for the flaw in March, but computers that have not installed the security update remain vulnerable.

I will confess that I was unaware registering the domain would stop the malware until after i registered it, so initially it was accidental.

The ransomware demands users pay $300 worth of cryptocurrency Bitcoin to retrieve their files, though it warns that the “payment will be raised” after a certain amount of time. Translations of the ransom message in 28 languages are included. The malware spreads through email.

“This was eminently predictable in lots of ways,” said Kalember. “As soon as the Shadow Brokers dump came out everyone [in the security industry] realised that a lot of people wouldn’t be able to install a patch, especially if they used an operating system like Windows XP [which many NHS computers still use], for which there is no patch.”

Security researchers with Kaspersky Lab have recorded more than 45,000 attacks in 74 countries, including the UK, Russia, Ukraine, India, China, Italy, and Egypt. In Spain, major companies including telecommunications firm Telefónica were infected.

By Friday evening, the ransomware had spread to the United States and South America, though Europe and Russia remained the hardest hit, according to security researchers Malware Hunter Team. The Russian interior ministry says about 1,000 computers have been affected.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/may/13/accidental-hero-finds-kill-switch-to-stop-spread-of-ransomware-cyber-attack

On – 13 May, 2017 By Nadia Khomami

Malware warning for Mac users, after HandBrake mirror download server hacked

A mirror download server for the popular tool HandBrake video file-transcoding app has been compromised by hackers, who replaced its Mac edition with malware.

The first most Mac users will know about the security incident will be when they visit the app’s website, at https://handbrake.fr, and see a link to a “Security Alert”:

Anyone who has downloaded HandBrake on Mac between [02/May/2017 14:30 UTC] and [06/May/2017 11:00 UTC] needs to verify the SHA1 / 256 sum of the file before running it.

Anyone who has installed HandBrake for Mac needs to verify their system is not infected with a Trojan. You have 50/50 chance if you’ve downloaded HandBrake during this period.

Up-date ESET security products detect the malicious download as OSX/Proton.A – a trojan horse which allows malicious attackers to remotely access infected Mac computers, opening up opportunities for hackers to take screenshots of infected computers, capture credit card details and passwords as they are entered on the keyboard, hijack the webcam, and steal files.

Concerned users of anti-virus products from other vendors would be wise to contact them directly to see if their Mac security solutions are detecting this latest variant of the Proton remote access trojan.

The sad truth, of course, is that Mac users are typically less likely to be running an anti-virus product than their Windows counterparts – making them a soft target for cybercriminals interested in targeting the platform. In recent years take-up of Mac security solutions has risen as the threat has risen – but it still drags (as do the malware numbers for the platform) compared to Microsoft Windows users.

Yes, there’s a lot less malware for Mac OS X than there is for Microsoft Windows, but that’s going to be little consolation if you’re unfortunate enough to find yourself a victim. Personally I think any Mac users connecting to the internet without an anti-virus solution in place is being downright foolhardy.

One longterm user of HandBrake described on the MacRumors forum just how close he came to having his credentials compromised by the malware attack:

Handbrake is an excellent program that has served me well over the years and I have great respect for the developers. Security slip-ups can happen to anyone and I’m sure they will take the necessary measures to improve this for future.

That said, I’m posting because I nearly got caught by this. I download Handbrake last week and was surprised to see a dialog on launch asking me to enter my password to “install additional codecs”. As a longtime Handbrake user I was certain that this was *not* normal, so I declined. Shortly afterword I was shown another dialog, independent from Handbrake, purporting to be from the system “Network Configuration” which needed my password to “update DHCP settings”. As this was also something I was unfamiliar with, I again declined but the dialog immediately reappeared upon clicking cancel and I had to restart the computer to make it go away. So yeah, if you see any suspicious password dialogs, do NOT enter your password.

HandBrake advises that users check the SHA checksum when they download new versions of the app from its mirror site, but it’s hard to imagine that many people ever bother to do such a thing. Most are, no doubt, in too much of a hurry burning DVDs and converting video files to bother with such dull and tedious security checks.

Checking checksums may be a chore, but in all likelihood it would have saved the bacon of some of the app’s downloaders in the last few days.

HandBrake.dmg files with the following checksums are infected:

SHA1: 0935a43ca90c6c419a49e4f8f1d75e68cd70b274
SHA256: 013623e5e50449bbdf6943549d8224a122aa6c42bd3300a1bd2b743b01ae6793

Author Graham Cluley, We Live Security

https://www.welivesecurity.com/2017/05/08/malware-warning-mac-users-handbrake-mirror-download-server-hacked/

On – 08 May, 2017 By Graham Cluley

K7 AntiVirus Plus 14

K7 AntiVirus Plus 14
Based in Chennai, India, antivirus company K7 Computing claims it has 10 million customers worldwide, most of whom are in Asia. K7 isn't a big name in the U.S., which may explain why the company hasn't submitted its AV software for review to PCMag …
Read more on PC Magazine

K7 Antivirus Plus 11.0
Jayaraman Kesavardhanan (nicknamed "keseven") founded Chennai-based K7 Computing in 1991, and the company just celebrated achieving 10 million users. Most of those users are in Asia, though. The company isn't well-known in the U.S. K7 Antivirus …
Read more on PC Magazine

K7 Ultimate Security Gold 14
Mediocre antivirus ratings in hands-on tests and lab tests. Flagged many PCMag utilities as malware. Useless parental control system. Mediocre phishing protection. No online backup. Private data protection potentially exposes private data. Antispam …
Read more on PC Magazine

RegCure” Provides People With An Advanced Windows Registry Cleaner Software

RegCure” Provides People With An Advanced Windows Registry Cleaner Software
RegCure is a new Windows registry cleaner program that is compatible with all Microsoft products and third party applications. This program uses the most sophisticated technology that helps people analyze their registry for missing, obsolete, and …
Read more on PR Web (press release)

Microsoft Updates Office Apps With 'Quick Access Commands' And Other Usability

Microsoft Updates Office Apps With 'Quick Access Commands' And Other Usability
While it's still not quite as easy as adding or editing a table on a desktop computer, Microsoft has significantly improved the experience here. Good work. The other major …. Android, multiple windows. A little slow (I have the actual tiny computer …
Read more on Android Police

A high-tech spring is in full bloom: column
There's usually plenty to see this time of year, because it's the season when tech giants like Apple, Google and Microsoft showcase the latest technology, and coax developers to incorporate it into their applications. In fact, the Samsung Developer …
Read more on kgw.com

Someone got Windows 95 running on an Apple Watch
As Lee points out in a blog post, the Apple Watch's specs are well above those of a typical Windows 95 computer, so it makes sense that it should be capable of running the Microsoft's old OS. Of course, there are quite a few hurdles to get past first …
Read more on The Verge

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